A  A  A   Print
COPD Patients Face Greater Risk of Heart Failure, Study Says

COPD Patients Face Greater Risk of Heart Failure, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, May 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with the lung condition known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a significantly increased risk of developing heart failure, and the risk is highest among black patients, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed more than 386 million hospital patient discharge records in the United States from 2001 through 2010, including more than 33 million COPD patients aged 40 and older.

Nearly 29 percent of COPD patients had heart failure, compared with 13 percent of patients without COPD. The researchers then analyzed the data by race and found that about 35 percent of blacks with COPD had heart failure, compared with about 15 percent of blacks without COPD.

Among whites, nearly 29 percent of those with COPD and nearly 13 percent of those without COPD had heart failure. Among people of other races, the rates were about 25 percent and 11 percent, respectively, the investigators found. In cases where race was not reported, the rates were about 28 percent and 13 percent, respectively.

Among patients aged 40 to 59, heart failure occurred in 18 percent of those with COPD and about 5 percent of those without COPD. The rates among those aged 60 to 79 were about 27 percent and 14 percent, respectively. Among those aged 80 and older, the rates were about 39 percent and 24 percent, respectively, the study authors noted.

The study also revealed that patients with both COPD and heart failure had longer hospital stays, higher in-hospital death rates and were more likely to be discharged to long-term care facilities than those with COPD alone.

The study was presented at the American Thoracic Society's annual meeting, which concluded Wednesday in San Diego. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

"The co-existence of COPD and heart failure, which share common symptoms, may pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges," study corresponding author Dr. Marilyn Foreman, from the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, said in a society news release.

"The long-term effect of both diagnoses over time remains to be determined," she added.

The association between COPD and heart failure seen in the study does not prove a cause-and-effect link.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about COPD.

SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, May 18, 2014

 
Today's Interactive Tools
Related Items

The third-party content provided in the Health Library of phoebeputney.com is for informational purposes only and is not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your physician. If you or your child has or suspect you may have a health problem, please consult your primary care physician. If you or your child may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 or other emergency health care provider immediately in the United States or the appropriate health agency of your country. For more information regarding site usage, please visit: Privacy Information, Terms of Use or Disclaimer.

Follow us online:

© 2014 Phoebe Putney Health System  |  417 Third Avenue, Albany, Georgia 31701  |  Telephone 877.312.1167

Phoebe Putney Health System is a network of hospitals, family medicine clinics, rehab facilities, auxiliary services, and medical education training facilities. Founded in 1911,
Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital (the flagship hospital) is one of Georgia's largest comprehensive regional medical centers. From the beginning, Phoebe's mission and vision
has been to bring the finest medical talent and technology to the citizens of Southwest Georgia, and to serve all citizens of the community regardless of ability to pay.