A  A  A   Print
Men Face Higher Risk of Infections Related to Health Care

Men Face Higher Risk of Infections Related to Health Care

WEDNESDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women are less likely to develop infections related to receiving health care than men, according to a large new study.

After examining thousands of cases involving hospitalized patients, researchers found that women were at much lower risk for bloodstream infection and surgical-site infection than men. The study authors suggested that their findings could help health care providers reduce men's risk of these infections.

"By understanding the factors that put patients at risk for infections, clinicians may be able to design targeted prevention and surveillance strategies to improve infection rates and outcomes," lead study author Bevin Cohen, program director at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research to Prevent Infections at Columbia University School of Nursing, said in a university news release.

The study, recently published online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, revealed that the odds of developing a community-associated bloodstream infection were 30 percent higher among men. Meanwhile, the researchers found a 60 percent higher risk among men for health care-associated bloodstream infections as well as for surgical-site infections.

Biological differences between men and women's skin may play a role in men's increased risk for infection. Previous studies have shown there are more bacteria present at the insertion site of a central venous catheter on men than women.

These gender differences were less apparent in children younger than 12 and people older than 70, the study found.

"In addition to using enhanced infection risk profiles to improve infection rates, it may be sensible to conduct specialized preoperative skin decontamination procedures and postoperative wound care for men to further reduce the risk of infection," Cohen concluded.

More information

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has more about infections associated with health care.

SOURCE: Columbia University Medical Center, news release, May 30, 2013

 
Today's Interactive Tools
Related Items

The third-party content provided in the Health Library of phoebeputney.com is for informational purposes only and is not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease, or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your physician. If you or your child has or suspect you may have a health problem, please consult your primary care physician. If you or your child may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 or other emergency health care provider immediately in the United States or the appropriate health agency of your country. For more information regarding site usage, please visit: Privacy Information, Terms of Use or Disclaimer.

Follow us online:

© 2014 Phoebe Putney Health System  |  417 Third Avenue, Albany, Georgia 31701  |  Telephone 877.312.1167

Phoebe Putney Health System is a network of hospitals, family medicine clinics, rehab facilities, auxiliary services, and medical education training facilities. Founded in 1911,
Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital (the flagship hospital) is one of Georgia's largest comprehensive regional medical centers. From the beginning, Phoebe's mission and vision
has been to bring the finest medical talent and technology to the citizens of Southwest Georgia, and to serve all citizens of the community regardless of ability to pay.