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Poliovirus Vaccine Live Oral, OPVPoliovirus Vaccine Live Oral, OPV

Poliovirus Vaccine Live Oral, OPV oral solution

What is poliovirus vaccine live oral?

POLIOVIRUS VACCINE LIVE ORAL, OPV (Orimune®) is a liquid vaccine that is taken by mouth to helps prevent polio infection. Natural infection with the poliovirus causes paralyzing or crippling neuromuscular (muscle and nerve-related) damage. Orimune® is given to infants and children as part of their childhood vaccine schedules if they cannot receive the injectable form of the poliovirus vaccine called IPV. As an alternative to IPV, Orimune® is given between 12—18 months of age and then a "booster" dose is given between 4—6 years of age. Orimune® may be given to adults or adolescents not been previously vaccinated if there is a need for the person to travel to an area of the world where there is a risk of being infected with polio. Generic oral poliovirus vaccine is not available.

What should my health care professional know before I take poliovirus vaccine live oral?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • an immune deficiency (natural or due to cancer chemotherapy, radiation, or steroid therapy)

  • fever or infection

  • having intramuscular injections

  • infection with the HIV virus, or have AIDS

  • recent diarrhea or vomiting

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to vaccines, neomycin, streptomycin, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I take this medicine?

Poliovirus vaccine live oral (Orimune®) is given by a health-care professional. The solution may be taken directly; mixed in water, simple syrup, or milk; or given on bread, a sugar cube, or cake. This vaccine must never be given by injection, it is for use by mouth only.

The use of this vaccine must be officially recorded. Federal law requires that the manufacturer's name and lot number; name, address, and phone number of the person giving the vaccine; and the date of administration be recorded in the patient's permanent medical record.

Your health care professional will give you an informational paper on the oral poliovirus vaccine at the time of the vaccination. Be sure to read this information.

What if I miss a dose?

Remember to keep appointments for follow-up doses for your infant or child. Notify your health care professional if you are unable to keep an appointment, or miss a scheduled dose. Try to reschedule the appointment as soon as you can.

What drug(s) may interact with poliovirus vaccine live oral?

  • chemotherapy

  • cholera vaccine

  • corticosteroids

  • other medicines that suppress your immune function

  • plague vaccine

  • typhoid vaccine

Tell your doctor or pharmacist: about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines; if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol; if you smoke; or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

Oral poliovirus vaccine does not interfere with some of the other vaccines that are commonly given to children, such as oral rotavirus vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), Hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and varicella vaccines. In some cases more than one type of vaccine can be given to your child at the same time. Ask your health care provider if you have questions regarding the administration of more than one vaccine to your child.

What should I watch for while taking poliovirus vaccine live oral?

Report any side effects to your doctor that do not go away within 3 days. Very rarely, this vaccine may cause polio infection in some people. Ask your prescriber about the risks of receving OPV vaccine.

There is a very small risk of passing the poliovirus to someone else after you have received this vaccine. Ask your doctor about immunization for other family members.

After you have a dose of poliovirus vaccine you can shed the virus in your feces (stool) or from your mouth. Avoid persons that have not had poliovirus vaccine, those with a weakened immune system, and pregnant women. Make sure you wash your hands well after going to the bathroom, or after changing a diaper for an infant that has received the vaccine.

Do not have any injections into your muscles for at least 30 days before or after you have the oral poliovirus vaccine.

What side effects may I notice from taking poliovirus vaccine live oral?

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • confusion

  • difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, wheezing, or coughing

  • changes in stools, like diarrhea (3 or more stools in a day)

  • decreased activity

  • decreased appetite- not wanting to breast-feed or take a bottle

  • extreme irritability

  • seizures (convulsions or strange movements of the arms or legs)

  • severe rash, itching (hives)

  • swelling of the eyes or face

  • unusual or increased crying, or sudden change in alertness

  • fever over 102 degrees F

  • numbness in the arms or legs

  • unusual weakness

  • vomiting

Call your health care provider if any of these symptoms occur within 4 weeks of vaccination of your infant.

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • mild fever, below 102 degrees F

Where can I keep my medicine?

Each dose of this poliovirus vaccine will be administered in the clinic or office of a health care professional. You will not be given vaccine doses to store at home.


 
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